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What makes a great plan for promoting the calculator

This is part of a series of "what makes a great.." notes to help people who are interested in copying the 2050 calculator. They are ideals, which the UK calculator may not live up to.

Once all the parts of the 2050 calculator have been developed, checked and improved with stakeholders, the next step is to promote its use.

A great plan

A great plan would describe:

  • Who you want to reach,
  • What you want them to do as a result, and
  • How you are going to reach them

Who you want to reach

A great plan would state how and when the following groups of people are going to be reached:

  1. Ministers(in the energy, environment, transport, housing, industry and treasury departments)
  2. Civil servants (in particular, those involved with strategy and long range planning in energy, environment, transport, housing, industry and treasury departments)
  3. Energy industry (in particular their strategy teams)
  4. NGOs with an interest in energy and the environment
  5. Academics (in particular, those involved in teaching courses on energy systems or doing allied research)
  6. Members of parliament (in particular those on committees that relate to energy and or the environment)
  7. Particular activist or enthusiastic members of the public
  8. The wider public

What you want them to do as a result

A great plan would, for each group above, state what you want them to do as a result. Options include:

  1. Understand the energy system
    1. The different technologies
    2. How they relate
  2. Understand the choices that exist:
    1. The choices that are subject to the most disagreement
    2. The choices that make the biggest difference
  3. Help people to articulate their preferences:
    1. Help people to select the combination of choices that they prefer
    2. Help people understand the implications of that selection
  4. Help build consensus around a narrower range of choices:
    1. Help people to understand other people's selections
    2. Start a process of consensus building about which choices are preferable

How you are going to reach them

A great plan would, for each group above, state what you want them to do as a result, and then specify how that was to going to be acheived. Options include:

Face to face approaches:

  • One-to-one briefings
  • Workshops (which can be more or less deliberative)
  • Presentations

Enabling others to make face to face approaches:

  • Teaching the teachers
  • Toolkits and support materials

Written approaches

  • Integrating the tool into wider documents
  • Press coverage
  • Written articles
  • Blog posts

Other approaches

  • Adding other people's pathways to your tool
  • Videos
  • Online debates
  • Competitions

The rest of this page goes into a bit more detail on these approaches.

Detail on approaches to using the tool

One-to-one briefings

Take the calclutor on a laptop and use it with senior decision makers to explore the future of the energy system.

Structure:

  1. A few minutes explaining the steps taken in developing the tool, emphasising the different groups that have checked and supported its development.
  2. A few minutes using the tool to show some of the things that can be learnt by using it
  3. Using the tool to answer questions that the decision makers have (e.g., what would happen if we didn't have nuclear; if they are interested in solar, show what difference solar makes)

We have also found it useful to take a laptop with the 2050 calculator along to one-to-one briefings on different subjects and then, if a point is made or a question raised in the meeting that could be answered with the calculator, quickly opening it up and making the point or answering the question.

Workshops

Book a room that has sufficient computers for a computer each or a computer between two.

Structure:

  1. A few minutes explaining why the tool was developed and who supports it
  2. Allow attendees to use the tool to create their preferred pathway (can take 40 minutes)
  3. Explain what the team has learnt from using the tool (using the tool to demonstrate those points)
  4. Allow attendees to spend another 10 minutes improving their pathway
  5. Encourage

Presentations

Teaching the teachers

Toolkits and support materials

Integrating the tool into wider documents

The tool can be used to set the context for governemnt documents. For example:

  • We use it to describe a range of long term pathways when laying out DECC's plans to 2027 in our "Carbon Plan"
  • We used pathways from the tool as context for more detailed studies of electricity systems balancing[1]
  • Some of our stakeholders, have used pathways to provide context in their documents:
    • E.g., National Grid Offshore Development Information Statement Future cenarios Consultation[2]
    • E.g., The Friend's of the Earth NGO's Just Transition report[3]

To enable this, we have found it useful to:

  1. Tell other teams that this is possible, to implant the idea
  2. Provide some training to other teams that are interested
  3. Have staff available to answer the questions that these teams have

Press coverage

Written articles

Blog posts

Adding other people's pathways to your tool

Videos

Online debates

Competitions

Previous: What makes a great my2050 style front end

Up: Copying the 2050 calculator

 
  1. http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/11/meeting-energy-demand/future-elec-network/5767-understanding-the-balancing-challenge.pdf
  2. http://www.nationalgrid.com/NR/rdonlyres/99312A31-9D0A-42B6-8098-39D6CCC83A78/45576/Scenario_Paper.pdf
  3. http://www.foe.co.uk/resource/reports/just_transition.pdf